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What You Need to Know About the Coronavirus

Yavapai County Arizona

Sedona AZIt’s time to be vigilant, take precautions, and prepare.

Yavapai County Community Health Services Director Leslie Horton said, “Yavapai County has a history of collaborating with the local partner agencies, including all cities and towns, to protect the residents that call Yavapai County home. We are working together and reviewing plans and practiced responses that have been in place for years to make sure everyone is prepared for situations like the one we find ourselves in now with the worldwide spread of Coronavirus (Covid19).”

With the recent case of COVID-19 in California with no contact with anyone from Wuhan China, the CDC has warned the public to be vigilant in healthy precautions and to prepare for potential cases: Visit this link for an easy to follow checklist and share it with others.

The one Arizona patient is now out of isolation and is no longer infected by the virus. People who have come in close contact with the man haven’t shown any signs of the illness known as COVID-19, Maricopa County Public Health reported. Most of them have passed the 14-day monitoring period without displaying any symptoms. Six of the 15 confirmed cases in the U.S. have recovered.

What is the virus and how is it different from the flu?

The only thing it has in common with the flu is that they are both respiratory viruses. COVID-19 has more in common with the common cold. While we mostly hear about rhinoviruses, there are several strains of coronavirus common in the U.S. that cause nothing worse than a cold.

Older adults usually develop worse symptoms than younger and are more likely to develop complications. Like flu, it generally hits hardest among seniors, people with chronic diseases like heart disease, lung disease, and diabetes, and those with weakened immune systems like people undergoing cancer treatment.

There’s no vaccine for coronavirus, but seniors should get vaccinated for diseases like pneumococcus and Hib. Getting those two vaccinations will help in limiting complications. Talk to your health provider if those vaccines are right for you.

Men are more likely to be hit harder with COVID than women. This is partly because women have a better immune system, but also because men often delay medical care until symptoms are severe. Coronavirus or not, if you have a fever above 100, a cough, and/or sore throat, see your doctor.

For more FAQs about COVID-19 visit this link.

The best you can do to keep yourself from being infected?  It happens to be the same steps you take to keep yourself from getting colds and flu:

*Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
*Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
*Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
*Stay home when you are sick.
*Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
*Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.

Here are some preparation tips from Ready.gov:

*Store a two-week supply of water and food.
*Periodically check your regular prescription drugs to ensure a continuous supply in your home.
*Have any nonprescription drugs and other health supplies on hand, including pain relievers, stomach remedies, cough and cold medicines, fluids with electrolytes, and vitamins.
*Get copies and maintain electronic versions of health records from doctors, hospitals, pharmacies and other sources and store them, for personal reference. Get help accessing electronic health records.
*Talk with family members and loved ones about how they would be cared for if they got sick, or what will be needed to care for them in your home.

Health officials emphasize that those who haven’t gotten the vaccine yet should do so, even though we’ve likely reached the midpoint of flu season. The vaccine takes two weeks to provide full protection, but cannot only ward off the illness, it can reduce how bad your flu is if you catch it and reduce the chance you’ll be hospitalized.

Yavapai County Community Health Services is in continuous communications with Arizona Department of Health Services on the COVID-19 monitoring and situation and will keep the public

YCCHS still has plenty of flu vaccine and ask your doctor if you should get any others – just call 928-771-3122 to make an appointment at one of our locations in Prescott, Prescott Valley, Cottonwood and Chino Valley.

The latest CDC Health Alert Network (HAN) Update provides updated guidance on evaluating and testing persons under investigation (PUIs) for COVID-19. It supersedes previous guidance: See https://bit.ly/2I3ZNbJ

156 Comments

  1. @Oliva says:

    Danny Pearl!!?? He died in 2002 when Bush was president. We’re gonna start calling you “The Riddler” you know why!? Cause your so hate filled(that trump lost and AZ has 2 democratic senators) that you’ve completely lost your mind and have become a dribbling Nonsensical moron.. Get a freaking life alreadyz

  2. Ezekiel says:

    @Olivia dribbling nonsensical moron? to hold someone accountable? eye for an eye? bet you think Pakistan government is our friend? you get a freaking life.

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwjyy4LT0oLuAhVExVkKHT0HAv0QFjAHegQIFxAC&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.bbc.com%2Fnews%2Fworld-asia-52518015&usg=AOvVaw0GXiewYJ4TF37nm2npSAZ9

  3. Joey says:

    You may not like it but read it now.

    ROBIN SMITH / JAN. 4, 2021
    A Peaceful Transition of Power?
    Doing so requires the protection and integrity of our elections.

    A political narrative is being framed around the dispute between warring camps supporting their respective presidential candidates. If one accepts the premise of the fight to be singularly about the outcome of the November 3 election, giving that victor the right to occupy the White House for the next four years, the terms of the debate are shallow and expose the intents, motives, and insatiable ambitions of those perpetrating this shallow discussion.

    Instead, the terms of the debate must reflect the actual issue at hand — whether voter fraud occurred as a critical component of the national election overriding state legislatures, existing law, and the U.S. Constitution. Only then will deliberations prove worthy of the trust of Americans and our great nation’s founding.

    On January 20, 2021, there’s an expectation of a “peaceful transition of power” characteristic of this great constitutional republic. Is that peaceful transfer a demand, an expectation, or the result of the integrity of the institution of elections in America? Americans deserve the answer to that question to prove to be the latter. In reality, peaceful transitions of power are a result of a trusted process, not simply an organic outcome.

    History demonstrates the peaceful transfer of power began between bitter rivals — John Adams and Thomas Jefferson. Adams, the incumbent, was challenged by Jefferson in 1800 in a bitter election between the Federalists and the Democratic-Republicans, the newly formed partisan parties. Confusion reigned when the Electoral College tied, and the outcome of the election was determined by the House of Representatives casting 36 ballots for Thomas Jefferson to be America’s third president. The process was not pretty, yet the process worked.

    Two hundred twenty years later, the electoral process is still in place. But the American public has witnessed drastic changes. A two-tiered system of voting was constructed for 2020. If one voted in person, greater identity verification and security measures were observed, while those casting ballots by mail had to meet a lower bar. As votes were being counted on November 3, some states were observing extensions of the voting period past Election Day through court decisions, not actions of state legislative bodies as specified in the Constitution.

    While various groups are engaged in trench warfare to defend or disprove the tallies of November 3, facts are mounting that voting irregularities at best and actual criminal fraud at worst have occurred in many states:

    In Nevada, at least 1,500 listed as deceased, more than 19,000 nonresidents of the state, and almost 4,000 noncitizens cast ballots.
    In Arizona, almost 28,000 duplicate ballots were counted in Maricopa County.
    In Wisconsin, more than 200,000 mailed-in ballots were in question as clerks filled in missing information or harvested ballots.
    In Michigan, a sworn affidavit reflects one review of a sampling of 30,000 absentee ballots revealed 2,660 at invalid addresses and 229 cast on behalf of dead people.
    In Pennsylvania, an accounting analysis revealed that 202,377 more votes were counted than were actually cast.
    In Georgia, there were an estimated 70,000 ineligible votes because of lack of signature verification.
    In a 345-page DOJ report entitled “Federal Prosecution of Election Offenses,” a sweeping statement is made that we must acknowledge and embrace: “Our constitutional system of representative government only works when the worth of honest ballots is not diluted by invalid ballots procured by corruption. As the Supreme Court stated in a case upholding federal convictions for ballot box stuffing: ‘Every voter in a federal … election … whether he votes for a candidate with little chance of winning or for one with little chance of losing, has a right under the Constitution to have his vote fairly counted, without its being distorted by fraudulently cast votes.’”

    The truth is that voter fraud has been and remains an issue, and we must insist that legal votes alone are counted and that those committed to illegal voting and corruption are prosecuted.

  4. @joey says:

    So there was only voter fraud in the states democrats won aye.’ But all is well in the voting world that Republicans won. Hmmmmm. Sounds like a bunch of sore LOSERS and so call facts that have already been disproven.. oh BTW it looks like Georgia is going to follow Arizona lead and elect two Democratic Senators.

  5. Preston says:

    President Trump is a class act and will be at the inauguration because he represents the best of us and not the least of us. The best of us I.e. Republicans are far superior to the idiots elected and the world will see how great America is that Americans turn over our government peacefully even knowing they won’t last in power more than 4 years when they nation turns them out of the White House for being idiots. Then maybe we’ll re-elect a better batch again.

  6. @preston says:

    I guess the same is true today and that’s the reason the present idiot occupying the White House is leaving after only 1 term. Also looks like Georgia is following Arizona lead electing 2 democratic senators

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